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3 ways to successfully manage difference

3 ways to successfully manage difference

3 ways to value differencesBeing together again after so many years was pure delight. The connection seemed as if we were finishing a conversation begun only the day before.

Familiarity is so comforting.

Until…

…there’s too much of it and its dark side surfaces: lack of innovation, narrow-minded thinking, ingrained and unquestioned bias, outdated practices, and failure to grow as a person.

Boredom, too.

So, what’s the antidote to inflexible comfort zones with self-imposed boundaries that limit our potential? (more…)

The beauty of differences

The beauty of differences

 

power of differencesHubby returned from running errands and excitedly told me about the new screens that had been installed on the gas pumps—screens that played music and TV shows.

“What a great concept,” he gushed. “Now I don’t have to just stand there anymore.”

Had hubby participated in the University of Virginia time alone study, I know he would have been in the 58% of participants who said being alone with their thoughts was difficult. (more…)

Coloring inside AND outside the lines?

Coloring inside AND outside the lines?

coloring in the linesLast week was the local TEDx event—an extraordinary day of women, men, and children sharing their talents and personal stories about an idea worth sharing. Being a TED speaker is now on my bucket list.

While walking out of the auditorium, I asked a fellow attendee what she thought about the day. She said she enjoyed the content and the energy but wished that more of the speakers had been specific with their calls to action.

I hadn’t noticed that. (more…)

Get your brave on

Get your brave on

women supporting women

Mary Schaefer, today’s guest author, is a coach, trainer and consultant who works with leaders, managers and business owners—particularly those who need a manager-employee communication breakthrough or to create a positive, functional work environment. Mary’s mission is to create work cultures where organizations and human beings can both thrive. Mary holds a Master’s degree in HR and is one the the co-authors of The Character-Based Leader. You can connect with Mary on Twitter (@MarySchaefer) or through her website. #7 in an 8-part series.

 

“What’s it going to take?”  This is the question posed to me and other compatriots by my colleague, Jane Perdue.  What is it going to take to remedy the situations related to these questions?

 “Do you ever wonder what women, men and society need to do so that…

  • The contributions of all genders and races are called out regularly without the need for a calendar event?
  • Women and persons of color are designated as a doctor, not “a woman doctor;” as a scientist, not “a Latino scientist,” etc.?
  • Special designations aren’t needed in announcements, e.g.:  the first woman to lead the federal reserve, the first female best director Academy Award winner, the first African American female flight crew, etc.

(more…)

Get your brave on

If equity is a mere matter of view …

women supporting women

Today’s guest author is Ellen Weber, author, lecturercolumnist and Director, MITA International Brain Based Center. Ellen is recognized globally for her brain-compatible communicating, learning and assessment renewal work. MITA’s leadership approach facilitates brain-based strategies to raise motivation and achievement for innovative growth. Leaders and learners use parts of the brain never before used to achieve innovation never before achieved. You can connect with Ellen via Twitter where you’ll find her as @ellenfweber. #1 in an 8-part series.

 

If equity’s a mere matter of view …

… then what’s your perspective? Mine’s changed recently.

A few years ago I spoke to leaders in England on inequity from a mental perspective – and thought I’d offered a whole raft of brain tips to raise awareness for diversity at work. It turns out I left out the most pivotal piece. Let me back up to show you my omission, and its power for potential profit within a wider arena.

After my London conference, a dear friend – who’d moved to London after we completed PhDs together in British Columbia, invited me to a movie and dinner to catch up. This close buddy who now heads up a music department at a major research university, happens to be African American. Why’s that significant in this case? (more…)

Inclusion is a participative sport. Ready to play?

Inclusion is a participative sport. Ready to play?

inclusion is participative sport A Department of Labor report on the glass ceiling noted that “what’s important [in organizations] is comfort, chemistry, and collaboration.”

Chris Argyris, business theorist and professor, says there’s a universal human tendency to organize our lives around remaining in control and winning.

Might these hidden needs be the reason most companies have failed at incorporating diversity as a normal business practice despite all the research that demonstrates its positive impacts on the bottom line? (more…)