perfection overrated

 

I couldn’t believe it.

She unmade my side of the bed because I didn’t do it right.

My house guest was having problems with her shoulder. She said doing simple things like making up a bed aggravated her discomfort. I volunteered to help, and she agreed. Her ground rule for accepting help was that she would make up one side of the queen-sized bed and I’d do the other. Worked for me. We agreed she’d give me a shout-out the next morning when she was ready to make up her bed.

Puzzled, and feeling a little miffed, I walked over to the side she’d made up. Perhaps she had a different way of tucking in the top sheet. Nope, we’d both done hospital corners. Granted, her angle on the fold was a little crisper than mine. That was the only difference I could see.

What she saw was different.

My side wasn’t perfect like hers was, and she wasn’t going to settle for less than perfect even if it made her wince to first pull out and then redo my work.

Pain is too big a price to pay for perfection.

In the past, I’ve done my dances with perfection, and I refuse to dance with it anymore. Perfection is an unworthy goal. It’s over-rated, not worth the added time, stress, and frustration.

Perfection is overrated, boring. It’s the imperfections—the vulnerabilities, the weaknesses, the human elements—that make us who we are, that make us real, beautiful…necessary. ~Guy Harrison

Before you dance another dance with perfection, give the following items a good think and ask yourself if perfection is truly worth it.

 

9 ways perfection is overrated

 

  1. Most people don’t recognize perfection when they see it.

Why? Because people describe perfection differently. Perfection is an absence of flaws or defects. Perfection, like beauty, rests in the eye of the beholder. I didn’t see any flaws or defects in my side of the made-up bed. My friend did.

  1. Lost opportunity cost.

Rendering anything with flaw or defect takes time—the time to do and time to redo until perfection is achieved. Some perfectionists are chronic procrastinators. They put off starting something because they’re concerned about not being able to complete the task perfectly.

  1. Miss out on simple joys.

It’s hard to look perfect eating an ice cream cone outside on a hot, summer day. There’s a good chance ice cream will drip down the cone and your chin. It might drip on your shirt and your fingers. But, isn’t all that part of the glorious fun?

  1. Present as needy and narrow-minded.

Perfectionism is a prime breeding ground for my way or the highway thinking, which is a death knell for diversity of thought, opinion, and perspective.

  1. Perfectionism feeds sex and gender stereotypes.

The perfect woman is beautiful, thin, and flawlessly groomed all the time. The perfect man is strong, a protector and provider. Both thoughts are poppycock, full of stereotypical thinking that harms young girls and boys.

  1. Being perfect doesn’t automatically provide approval and affirmation.

Stop looking outside yourself for approval and affirmation. Give it to yourself, and good enough will do.

  1. Perfectionism will make you sick.

Perfectionists have greater stress. They’re at greater risk for depression, high blood pressure, anxiety, and mental health problems.

  1. Fuel negative emotions.

Striving unsuccessfully for that elusive state where there are no flaws or defects makes people feel inferior, resentful, unappreciated, and unfulfilled. They’re full of self-doubt. Maybe anger, too. Perfectionism reduces people’s level of playfulness and willingness to take risks.

  1. Consumed and paralyzed by fear.

Perfectionism is a cesspool of fear. Perfectionists fear failure, not measuring up, making a mistake, not looking perfect, getting hurt, being exposed as a fraud, and being alone.

Perfectionists often feel that they must always be strong and in control of their emotions. A perfectionist may avoid talking about personal fears, inadequacies, insecurities, and disappointments with others, even with those with whom they are closest. ~Shauna H Springer Ph.D.

Wanting to be a good person who does things well is a worthy goal. Looking to do those things perfectly isn’t. Being perfect is an overrated experience that serves no one well.

Perfectionism is not about striving for excellence or healthy striving. It’s…a way of thinking and feeling that says this: ‘If I look perfect, do it perfect, work perfect and live perfect, I can avoid or minimize shame, blame and judgment.’ ~Brene Brown

Ready to give yourself permission to let go of overrated perfection and instead do your best and accept good enough?

I agree! Perfection is an overrated waste of time, effort, and energy. Click To Tweet

 

Image credit before quote added: Pixabay

 

 

 

 

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